SAR Library Catalog

Uqalurait : an oral history of Nunavut / compiled and edited by John Bennett and Susan Rowley ; foreword by Suzanne Evaloardjuk ... [et al.].

By: Bennett, JohnContributor(s): Rowley, Susan Diana MaryMaterial type: TextTextSeries: McGill-Queen's native and northern series ; 36Publisher: Montreal ; Ithaca [N.Y.] : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2004Description: xxxii, 473 p., [14] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps, ports ; 25 cmISBN: 0773523405 (acidfree paper)Subject(s): Inuit -- Nunavut -- History | Inuit -- Nunavut -- Social life and customs | Ethnology -- Nunavut | Oral History -- Nunavut | Inuit -- Nunavut -- Histoire | Inuit -- Nunavut -- Moeurs et coutumes | Ethnologie -- Nunavut | Histoire orale | Nunavut -- History | Nunavut -- Social life and customs | Nunavut -- HistoireDDC classification: 305.897/124/097195 LOC classification: E99.E7 | B35 2004Summary: Uqalurait, pointed snowdrifts formed by Arctic blizzards, "would tell us which direction to go in," says elder Mariano Aupilarjuk. This oral history, guided by the traditional knowledge of Inuit elders from across Nunavut, also follows the uqalurait. Thousands of quotes from over three hundred Inuit elders about their culture and customs cover all aspects of traditional life, from raising children to hunting, the land, and architecture, to belief systems, cosmology, and the Inuit's remarkable ability to make do with what they had. Given the recent creation of Nunavut and current attention to the Arctic due to climate change, Uqalurait is a timely source of insight from a people whose values of sharing and respect for the environment have helped them to live for centuries at the northern limit of the inhabitable world.
List(s) this item appears in: Staley 2020 Reading List - The Inuit
Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Main library collection
Stacks
970.3 Eskimo Ben 2004 Available t 18773
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (p. [451]-456) and indexes.

Uqalurait, pointed snowdrifts formed by Arctic blizzards, "would tell us which direction to go in," says elder Mariano Aupilarjuk. This oral history, guided by the traditional knowledge of Inuit elders from across Nunavut, also follows the uqalurait.

Thousands of quotes from over three hundred Inuit elders about their culture and customs cover all aspects of traditional life, from raising children to hunting, the land, and architecture, to belief systems, cosmology, and the Inuit's remarkable ability to make do with what they had. Given the recent creation of Nunavut and current attention to the Arctic due to climate change, Uqalurait is a timely source of insight from a people whose values of sharing and respect for the environment have helped them to live for centuries at the northern limit of the inhabitable world.

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