SAR Library Catalog

Talking in context : language and identity in Kwakwa̲ka̲'wakw society / Anne Marie Goodfellow.

By: Goodfellow, AnneMaterial type: TextTextSeries: McGill-Queen's native and northern series ; 46Publisher: Montreal ; Ithaca : McGill-Queen's University Press, c2005Description: xii, 219 p. : ill., map ; 24 cmISBN: 077352875XOther title: Language and identity in Kwakwa̲ka̲'wakw societySubject(s): Kwakiutl language -- Social aspects -- British Columbia | Language and culture -- British Columbia | English language -- Influence on Kwakiutl | Kwakiutl Indians -- British Columbia -- Ethnic identity | Languages in contact -- British ColumbiaDDC classification: 306.44/089/97953 LOC classification: PM1641 | .G66 2005Online resources: Contributor biographical information Summary: A unique study of the relationship between language - and the erosion of a language - and cultural identity in heritage-language communities. Though linguists estimate that hundreds of languages are in danger of extinction, everyday use of Kwak'wala, an indigenous language spoken in British Columbia, reveals that it has been strategically maintained even among young speakers as a marker of cultural identity. Anne Marie Goodfellow explores the relationship between language, culture, and identity through a case study of the current use of Kwak'wala in two communities, Quatsino and Kingcome Inlet. Talking in Context demonstrates the importance of cultural contact on the structure of languages and addresses the socio-cultural aspects of indigenous language use in the modern world. Goodfellow's analysis of linguistic data from three generations of Kwak'wala speakers shows that English has greatly influenced grammar and phonology. Even though Kwak'wala is being replaced by English as the language of communication, Goodfellow found that speakers with varying degrees of fluency use the native language tactically to signal Kwak'wala identity and for ceremony.Talking in Context shows the ways in which indigenous languages may one day be restored to broader uses in the communities to which they are significant.
List(s) this item appears in: New Arrivals - 2019 spring/summer
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306.44 Goo 2005 Available T 18908
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Includes bibliographical references (p. [203]-215) and index.

A unique study of the relationship between language - and the erosion of a language - and cultural identity in heritage-language communities. Though linguists estimate that hundreds of languages are in danger of extinction, everyday use of Kwak'wala, an indigenous language spoken in British Columbia, reveals that it has been strategically maintained even among young speakers as a marker of cultural identity. Anne Marie Goodfellow explores the relationship between language, culture, and identity through a case study of the current use of Kwak'wala in two communities, Quatsino and Kingcome Inlet. Talking in Context demonstrates the importance of cultural contact on the structure of languages and addresses the socio-cultural aspects of indigenous language use in the modern world. Goodfellow's analysis of linguistic data from three generations of Kwak'wala speakers shows that English has greatly influenced grammar and phonology. Even though Kwak'wala is being replaced by English as the language of communication, Goodfellow found that speakers with varying degrees of fluency use the native language tactically to signal Kwak'wala identity and for ceremony.Talking in Context shows the ways in which indigenous languages may one day be restored to broader uses in the communities to which they are significant.

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