SAR Library Catalog

After and before the lightning / Simon J. Ortiz.

By: Ortiz, Simon J, 1941-Material type: TextTextSeries: Sun tracks: v. 28.Publisher: Tucson : University of Arizona Press, c1994Description: xvi, 127 p. ; 24 cmISBN: 0816514232 (alk. paper); 0816514488 (pbk. : alk. paper)Subject(s): Ortiz, Simon J., 1941-DDC classification: 810.8 s | 813/.54 LOC classification: PS501 | .S85 vol.28 | PS3565.R77Summary: Acoma Pueblo poet Ortiz spent a winter in South Dakota, teaching at Sinte Gleska College on the Rosebud Lakota Sioux Reservation. The bitter cold and driving snow of a prairie winter were a reality commanding his attention through its absolute challenge to survival and the meaning of survival. Ortiz's way of dealing with the hard elements of winter was to write After and Before the Lightning, prose and verse poems that were his response to that long season between the thunderstorms of autumn and spring. "I needed a map of where I was and what I was doing in the cosmos," he writes. In these poems, which he regards as a book-length poetic work, he charts the vast spaces of prairie and time that often seem indistinguishable. As he faces the reality of winter on the South Dakota reservation, he also confronts the harsh political reality for its Native community and culture and for Indian people everywhere.
List(s) this item appears in: New Arrivals - 2019 spring/summer
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810.8 Ortiz 1994 Available T 18932
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Poems and prose.

Acoma Pueblo poet Ortiz spent a winter in South Dakota, teaching at Sinte Gleska College on the Rosebud Lakota Sioux Reservation. The bitter cold and driving snow of a prairie winter were a reality commanding his attention through its absolute challenge to survival and the meaning of survival. Ortiz's way of dealing with the hard elements of winter was to write After and Before the Lightning, prose and verse poems that were his response to that long season between the thunderstorms of autumn and spring. "I needed a map of where I was and what I was doing in the cosmos," he writes. In these poems, which he regards as a book-length poetic work, he charts the vast spaces of prairie and time that often seem indistinguishable. As he faces the reality of winter on the South Dakota reservation, he also confronts the harsh political reality for its Native community and culture and for Indian people everywhere.

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