McElvain Library Catalog
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List(s) this item appears in: New Arrivals - 2019 September
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951 Liu 2012 Available T 18973
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 413-462) and index.

Machine generated contents note: 1. Chinese archaeology: past, present, and future; 2 Environment and ecology; 3. Foragers and collectors in the Pleistocene-Holocene transition (24,000-9000 cal. BP); 4. Domestication of plants and animals; 5. Neolithization: sedentism and food production in the Early Neolithic (7000-5000 BC); 6. Emergence of social inequality: the Middle Neolithic (5000-3000 BC); 7. Rise and fall of early complex societies: the Late Neolithic (3000-2000 BC); 8. Formation of early states in the Central Plain: Erlitou and Erligang (1900/1800-1250 BC); 9. Bronze cultures of the north frontiers and beyond during the early second millennium BC; 10. The Late Shang dynasty and its neighbors (1250-1046 BC); 11. Chinese civilization in comparative perspective.

"Past, present and future "The archaeological materials recovered from the Anyang excavations ... in the period between 1928 and 1937...have laid a new foundation for the study of ancient China (Li, C. 1977: ix)." When inscribed oracle bones and enormous material remains were found through scientific excavation in Anyang in 1928, the historicity of the Shang dynasty was confirmed beyond dispute for the first time (Li, C. 1977: ix-xi). This excavation thus marked the beginning of a modern Chinese archaeology endowed with great potential to reveal much of China's ancient history.. Half a century later, Chinese archaeology had made many unprecedented discoveries which surprised the world, leading Glyn Daniel to believe that "a new awareness of the importance of China will be a key development in archaeology in the decades ahead (Daniel 1981: 211). This enthusiasm was soon shared by the Chinese archaeologists when Su Bingqi announced that "the Golden Age of Chinese archaeology is arriving (Su, B. 1994: 139--140)". In recent decades, archaeology has continuously prospered, becoming one of the most rapidly developing fields in social science in China"-- Ethnoarchaeology first developed as the study of ethnographic material culture from archaeological perspectives. Over the past half century it has expanded its scope, especially to cultural and social anthropology. Both authors are leading practitioners, and their theoretical perspective embraces both the processualism of the New Archaeology and the post-processualism of the 1980s and 90s. A case-study approach enables a balanced global geographic and topical coverage, including consideration of materials in French and German. Three introductory chapters discuss the subject and its history, survey the theory, and discuss field methods and ethics. Ten topical chapters consider formation processes, subsistence, the study of artefacts and style, settlement systems, site structure and architecture, specialist craft production, trade and exchange, and mortuary practices and ideology. Ethnoarchaeology in Action concludes with ethnoarchaeology's contributions actual and potential, and with a look at its place within anthropology. It is generously illustrated, including many photographs of leading ethnoarchaeologists in action.

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