McElvain Library Catalog
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List(s) this item appears in: New Arrivals - 2019 November
Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
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979 .004 Sal 2012 Available T 19008
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (p. 163-166) and index.

In my grandmother's kitchen -- Sharing breath: the grass is not always greener on the other side -- Pojoaque Pueblo and a garden of the ancients -- We still need rain spirits -- Bounty among the saguaro -- Small fields for large impacts on the Colorado Plateau -- Highways of diversity and querencia in Northern New Mexico -- Singing to turtles, singing for divine fire -- A new American Indian cuisine -- The whole enchilada.

"Eating is not only a political act, it is also a cultural act that reaffirms one’s identity and worldview," Enrique Salmón writes in Eating the Landscape. Traversing a range of cultures, including the Tohono O’odham of the Sonoran Desert and the Rarámuri of the Sierra Tarahumara, the book is an illuminating journey through the southwest United States and northern Mexico. Salmón weaves his historical and cultural knowledge as a renowned indigenous ethnobotanist with stories American Indian farmers have shared with him to illustrate how traditional indigenous foodways—from the cultivation of crops to the preparation of meals—are rooted in a time-honored understanding of environmental stewardship. In this fascinating personal narrative, Salmón focuses on an array of indigenous farmers who uphold traditional agricultural practices in the face of modern changes to food systems such as extensive industrialization and the genetic modification of food crops. Despite the vast cultural and geographic diversity of the region he explores, Salmón reveals common themes: the importance of participation in a reciprocal relationship with the land, the connection between each group’s cultural identity and their ecosystems, and the indispensable correlation of land consciousness and food consciousness. Salmón shows that these collective philosophies provide the foundation for indigenous resilience as the farmers contend with global climate change and other disruptions to long-established foodways. This resilience, along with the rich stores of traditional ecological knowledge maintained by indigenous agriculturalists, Salmón explains, may be the key to sustaining food sources for humans in years to come.--Provided by publisher

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