SAR Library Catalog

A Diné history of Navajoland / Klara Kelley and Harris Francis.

By: Kelley, Klara B [author.]Contributor(s): Francis, Harris, 1954- [author.]Material type: TextTextPublisher: Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2019Description: viii, 331 pages : illustrations, maps : 23 cmISBN: 9780816538744Subject(s): Navajo Indians -- HistoryDDC classification: 979.1004/9726 LOC classification: E99.N3 | K3345 2019
Contents:
Introduction: The Diné, the Land, Oral History, and Sovereignty -- 1. An Argument with Archaeologists -- 2. Abalone Buffalo People and Ancient Trails -- 3. Traditional Diné Maps, History as Geography -- 4. Diné-Anaasází Relations, Clans, and Ethnogenesis -- 5. Western Diné Frontline Landscapes before the Long Walk -- 6. "The People" Meet "Americans" on the Arizona Railroad Frontier -- 7. Indian Giving on the Railroad Frontier -- 8. Diné Traders before the 1950s -- 9. Diné Trading and Silversmithing at Borrego Pass Trading Post -- 10. Diné Workers in Underground Coal Mines around Gallup -- 11. Diné Land Use and Climate Change -- Afterword
Summary: "For the first time, a sweeping history of the Diné that is foregrounded in oral tradition. Authors Klara Kelley and Harris Francis share Diné history from pre-Columbian time to the present, using ethnographic interviews in which Navajo people reveal their oral histories on key events such as Athabaskan migrations, trading and trails, Diné clans, the Long Walk of 1864, and the struggle to keep their culture alive under colonizers who brought the railroad, coal mining, trading posts, and, finally, climate change. The early chapters, based on ceremonial origin stories, tell about Diné forebears. Next come the histories of Diné clans from late pre-Columbian to early post-Columbian times, and the coming together of the Diné as a sovereign people. Later chapters are based on histories of families, individuals, and communities, and tell how the Diné have struggled to keep their bond with the land under settler encroachment, relocation, loss of land-based self-­sufficiency through the trading-post system, energy resource extraction, and climate change. Archaeological and documentary information supplements the oral histories, providing a comprehensive investigation of Navajo history and offering new insights into their twentieth-century relationships with Hispanic and Anglo settlers."--publisher's website
List(s) this item appears in: New Arrivals - 2021
Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Main library collection
New Arrivals
970.3 Navajo Kel 2019 Available T 19166
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (pages 285-320) and index.

Introduction: The Diné, the Land, Oral History, and Sovereignty -- 1. An Argument with Archaeologists -- 2. Abalone Buffalo People and Ancient Trails -- 3. Traditional Diné Maps, History as Geography -- 4. Diné-Anaasází Relations, Clans, and Ethnogenesis -- 5. Western Diné Frontline Landscapes before the Long Walk -- 6. "The People" Meet "Americans" on the Arizona Railroad Frontier -- 7. Indian Giving on the Railroad Frontier -- 8. Diné Traders before the 1950s -- 9. Diné Trading and Silversmithing at Borrego Pass Trading Post -- 10. Diné Workers in Underground Coal Mines around Gallup -- 11. Diné Land Use and Climate Change -- Afterword

"For the first time, a sweeping history of the Diné that is foregrounded in oral tradition. Authors Klara Kelley and Harris Francis share Diné history from pre-Columbian time to the present, using ethnographic interviews in which Navajo people reveal their oral histories on key events such as Athabaskan migrations, trading and trails, Diné clans, the Long Walk of 1864, and the struggle to keep their culture alive under colonizers who brought the railroad, coal mining, trading posts, and, finally, climate change. The early chapters, based on ceremonial origin stories, tell about Diné forebears. Next come the histories of Diné clans from late pre-Columbian to early post-Columbian times, and the coming together of the Diné as a sovereign people. Later chapters are based on histories of families, individuals, and communities, and tell how the Diné have struggled to keep their bond with the land under settler encroachment, relocation, loss of land-based self-­sufficiency through the trading-post system, energy resource extraction, and climate change. Archaeological and documentary information supplements the oral histories, providing a comprehensive investigation of Navajo history and offering new insights into their twentieth-century relationships with Hispanic and Anglo settlers."--publisher's website

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