SAR Library Catalog

Globalization and race : transformations in the cultural production of blackness / edited by Kamari Maxine Clarke and Deborah A. Thomas.

Contributor(s): Clarke, Kamari Maxine, 1966- | Thomas, Deborah A, 1966-Material type: TextTextPublisher: Durham : Duke University Press, 2006Description: ix, 407 p. ; 24 cmISBN: 082233772X (pbk. : alk. paper); 0822337592 (cloth : alk. paper)Subject(s): Black race | Blacks -- Race identity | Blacks -- Folklore | African Americans in popular culture | Culture and globalization | Globalization -- Political aspects | African diasporaDDC classification: 305.896 LOC classification: GN645 | .G54 2006Online resources: Table of contents
Contents:
Introduction : Globalization and the transformations of race / Deborah A. Thomas and Kamari Maxine Clarke -- Missionary positions / Lee D. Baker -- History at the crossroads : vodú and the modernization of the Dominican borderlands / Robert L. Adams -- Diaspora and desire : gendering "Black America" in Black Liverpool / Jacqueline Nassy Brown -- Diaspora space, ethnographic space : writing history between the lines / Tina M. Campt -- "Mama, I'm walking to Canada" : Black geopolitics and invisible empires / Naomi Pabst -- Mapping transnationality : roots tourism and the institutionalization of ethnic heritage / Kamari Maxine Clarke -- Emigration and the spatial production of difference from Cape Verde / Kesha Fikes -- Folkloric "others" : blanqueamiento and the celebration of Blackness as an exception in Puerto Rico / Isar P. Godreau -- Gentrification, globalization, and georaciality / John L. Jackson Jr. -- Recasting "Black Venus" in the "New" African diaspora / Jayne O. Ifekwunigwe -- "Shooting the White girl first" : race in postapartheid South Africa / Grant Farred -- Havana's Timba : A macho sound for Black sex / Ariana Hernandez-Reguant -- Reading Buffy and "looking proper" : race, gender, and consumption among West Indian girls in Brooklyn / Oneka LaBennett -- The homegrown : race, rap, and class in London / Raymond Codrington -- Racialization, gender, and the negotiation of power in Stockholm's African dance courses / Lena Sawyer -- Modern blackness : progress, "America," and the politics of popular culture in Jamaica / Deborah A. Thomas.
Summary: "Kamari Maxine Clarke and Deborah A. Thomas argue that a firm grasp of globalization requires an understanding of how race has constituted, and been constituted by, global transformations. Focusing attention on race as an analytic category, this state-of-the-art collection of essays explores the changing meanings of blackness in the context of globalization. It illuminates the connections between contemporary global processes of racialization and transnational circulations set in motion by imperialism and slavery; between popular culture and global conceptions of blackness; and between the work of anthropologists, policymakers, religious revivalists, and activists and the solidification and globalization of racial categories. A number of the essays bring to light the formative but not unproblematic influence of African American identity on other populations within the black diaspora. Among these are an examination of the impact of “black America” on racial identity and politics in mid-twentieth-century Liverpool and an inquiry into the distinctive experiences of blacks in Canada. Contributors investigate concepts of race and space in early-twenty-first century Harlem, the experiences of trafficked Nigerian sex workers in Italy, and the persistence of race in the purportedly non-racial language of the “New South Africa.” They highlight how blackness is consumed and expressed in Cuban timba music, in West Indian adolescent girls’ fascination with Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and in the incorporation of American rap music into black London culture. Connecting race to ethnicity, gender, sexuality, nationality, and religion, these essays reveal how new class economies, ideologies of belonging, and constructions of social difference are emerging from ongoing global transformations."--publisher's website
List(s) this item appears in: New Arrivals - 2021
Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Main library collection
Stacks
305.896 Glo 2006 Available T 19167
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (p. [355]-389) and index.

Introduction : Globalization and the transformations of race / Deborah A. Thomas and Kamari Maxine Clarke -- Missionary positions / Lee D. Baker -- History at the crossroads : vodú and the modernization of the Dominican borderlands / Robert L. Adams -- Diaspora and desire : gendering "Black America" in Black Liverpool / Jacqueline Nassy Brown -- Diaspora space, ethnographic space : writing history between the lines / Tina M. Campt -- "Mama, I'm walking to Canada" : Black geopolitics and invisible empires / Naomi Pabst -- Mapping transnationality : roots tourism and the institutionalization of ethnic heritage / Kamari Maxine Clarke -- Emigration and the spatial production of difference from Cape Verde / Kesha Fikes -- Folkloric "others" : blanqueamiento and the celebration of Blackness as an exception in Puerto Rico / Isar P. Godreau -- Gentrification, globalization, and georaciality / John L. Jackson Jr. -- Recasting "Black Venus" in the "New" African diaspora / Jayne O. Ifekwunigwe -- "Shooting the White girl first" : race in postapartheid South Africa / Grant Farred -- Havana's Timba : A macho sound for Black sex / Ariana Hernandez-Reguant -- Reading Buffy and "looking proper" : race, gender, and consumption among West Indian girls in Brooklyn / Oneka LaBennett -- The homegrown : race, rap, and class in London / Raymond Codrington -- Racialization, gender, and the negotiation of power in Stockholm's African dance courses / Lena Sawyer -- Modern blackness : progress, "America," and the politics of popular culture in Jamaica / Deborah A. Thomas.

"Kamari Maxine Clarke and Deborah A. Thomas argue that a firm grasp of globalization requires an understanding of how race has constituted, and been constituted by, global transformations. Focusing attention on race as an analytic category, this state-of-the-art collection of essays explores the changing meanings of blackness in the context of globalization. It illuminates the connections between contemporary global processes of racialization and transnational circulations set in motion by imperialism and slavery; between popular culture and global conceptions of blackness; and between the work of anthropologists, policymakers, religious revivalists, and activists and the solidification and globalization of racial categories. A number of the essays bring to light the formative but not unproblematic influence of African American identity on other populations within the black diaspora. Among these are an examination of the impact of “black America” on racial identity and politics in mid-twentieth-century Liverpool and an inquiry into the distinctive experiences of blacks in Canada. Contributors investigate concepts of race and space in early-twenty-first century Harlem, the experiences of trafficked Nigerian sex workers in Italy, and the persistence of race in the purportedly non-racial language of the “New South Africa.” They highlight how blackness is consumed and expressed in Cuban timba music, in West Indian adolescent girls’ fascination with Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and in the incorporation of American rap music into black London culture. Connecting race to ethnicity, gender, sexuality, nationality, and religion, these essays reveal how new class economies, ideologies of belonging, and constructions of social difference are emerging from ongoing global transformations."--publisher's website

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