SAR Library Catalog

Nación genízara : ethnogenesis, place, and identity in new mexico / edited by Moises Gonzales, Enrique R. Lamadrid.

Contributor(s): Lamadrid, Enrique R, 1948- [editor.] | Gonzales, Moises [editor.]Material type: TextTextSeries: Querencias seriesPublisher: Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2019Edition: FirstDescription: xxviii, 359 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cmISBN: 9780826361073Subject(s): Ethnohistory -- New Mexico | Indians of North America -- New Mexico | Slavery | Racism | Ethnicity -- New Mexico
Contents:
Foreword: Recordando el futuro = Remembering the future: mal-criados, memory, and memorials / Estevan Rael-Gálvez -- Estrellita Reluciente del Pueblo de Abiquiú: coplas de entrada = Little Shining Star of Abiquiú: verses of entry / David F. Garcia -- Nación Genízara: ethnogenesis, place, and identity in New Mexico / Enrique R. Lamadrid and Moises Gonzales -- Visualizing genízaro cultural memory and ritual celebration / Miguel A. Gandert -- Mexican Indians and genízaros: soldier-farmer and allies in the defense and agricultural development of New Mexico / Tomás Martínez Saldaña, Enrique R. Lamadrid, and José A. Rivera -- Genízaros and cultural systems of slavery in the Hispanic southwest / William S. Kiser -- Genízara self-advocacy in eighteenth-century New Mexico / Cristina Durán -- The genízaro origins of the Hermanos Penitentes / Ramón A. Gutiérrez -- The colonial Genízaro Mission Pueblo of Belén / Samuel E. Sisneros -- Genízaro ethnogenesis and the archaeological record / Charles M. Carrillo -- Survival of captivity: hybrid identities, gender, and culture in territorial Colorado / Virginia Sánchez -- Genízaro settlements of the Sierra Sandía: resilience and identity in the land grants of San Miguel del Cañón de Carnué de San Antonio de las Huertas / Moises Gonzales -- Huellas de sangre, amor, y lágrimas: rescatando a mis cautivas = Trails of blood, love, and tears: rescuing my captives / Susan M. Gandert -- Genízaro salvation: the poetics of G. Benito Córdova's Genízaro Nation / Michael L. Trujillo -- Sangre de Indio que corre en mis venas: Nativo poetics and Nuevomexicano identity / Levi Romero -- Genízaro identity and DNA: the helix of our Native American genetic history / Miguel A. Tórrez -- Epilogue: persistence and resistence in genízaro identity / Teresa Córdova.
Summary: "Nación Genízara examines the history, cultural evolution, and survival of the Genízaro people. The contributors to this volume cover topics including ethnogenesis, slavery, settlements, poetics, religion, gender, family history, and mestizo genetics. Fray Angélico Chávez defined Genízaro as the ethnic term given to indigenous people of mixed tribal origins living among the Hispano population in Spanish fashion. They entered colonial society as captives taken during wars with Utes, Apaches, Comanches, Kiowas, Navajos, and Pawnees. Genízaros comprised a third of the population by 1800. Many assimilated into Hispano and Pueblo society, but others in the land-grant communities maintained their identity through ritual, self-government, and kinship. Today the persistence of Genízaro identity blurs the lines of distinction between Native and Hispanic frameworks of race and cultural affiliation. This is the first study to focus exclusively on the detribalized Native experience of the Genízaro in New Mexico"--Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: New Arrivals - 2021
Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Main library collection
New Arrivals
305.897 Nac 2019 Checked out 05/31/2021 T 19177
Total holds: 0

Foreword: Recordando el futuro = Remembering the future: mal-criados, memory, and memorials / Estevan Rael-Gálvez -- Estrellita Reluciente del Pueblo de Abiquiú: coplas de entrada = Little Shining Star of Abiquiú: verses of entry / David F. Garcia -- Nación Genízara: ethnogenesis, place, and identity in New Mexico / Enrique R. Lamadrid and Moises Gonzales -- Visualizing genízaro cultural memory and ritual celebration / Miguel A. Gandert -- Mexican Indians and genízaros: soldier-farmer and allies in the defense and agricultural development of New Mexico / Tomás Martínez Saldaña, Enrique R. Lamadrid, and José A. Rivera -- Genízaros and cultural systems of slavery in the Hispanic southwest / William S. Kiser -- Genízara self-advocacy in eighteenth-century New Mexico / Cristina Durán -- The genízaro origins of the Hermanos Penitentes / Ramón A. Gutiérrez -- The colonial Genízaro Mission Pueblo of Belén / Samuel E. Sisneros -- Genízaro ethnogenesis and the archaeological record / Charles M. Carrillo -- Survival of captivity: hybrid identities, gender, and culture in territorial Colorado / Virginia Sánchez -- Genízaro settlements of the Sierra Sandía: resilience and identity in the land grants of San Miguel del Cañón de Carnué de San Antonio de las Huertas / Moises Gonzales -- Huellas de sangre, amor, y lágrimas: rescatando a mis cautivas = Trails of blood, love, and tears: rescuing my captives / Susan M. Gandert -- Genízaro salvation: the poetics of G. Benito Córdova's Genízaro Nation / Michael L. Trujillo -- Sangre de Indio que corre en mis venas: Nativo poetics and Nuevomexicano identity / Levi Romero -- Genízaro identity and DNA: the helix of our Native American genetic history / Miguel A. Tórrez -- Epilogue: persistence and resistence in genízaro identity / Teresa Córdova.

"Nación Genízara examines the history, cultural evolution, and survival of the Genízaro people. The contributors to this volume cover topics including ethnogenesis, slavery, settlements, poetics, religion, gender, family history, and mestizo genetics. Fray Angélico Chávez defined Genízaro as the ethnic term given to indigenous people of mixed tribal origins living among the Hispano population in Spanish fashion. They entered colonial society as captives taken during wars with Utes, Apaches, Comanches, Kiowas, Navajos, and Pawnees. Genízaros comprised a third of the population by 1800. Many assimilated into Hispano and Pueblo society, but others in the land-grant communities maintained their identity through ritual, self-government, and kinship. Today the persistence of Genízaro identity blurs the lines of distinction between Native and Hispanic frameworks of race and cultural affiliation. This is the first study to focus exclusively on the detribalized Native experience of the Genízaro in New Mexico"--Provided by publisher.

Powered by Koha