SAR Library Catalog

Native American fiction : a user's manual / David Treuer.

By: Treuer, DavidMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: Saint Paul, Minn. : Graywolf Press, c2006Description: 212 p. ; 22 cmISBN: 155597452X (pbk.); 9781555974527 (pbk.)Subject(s): American fiction -- Indian authors -- History and criticismDDC classification: 813/.009897 LOC classification: PS153.I52 | T74 2006Online resources: Contributor biographical information | Publisher description | Table of contents only
Contents:
Introduction: The clouds overhead -- Smartberries -- Lonely wolf -- Plain binoculars -- How to hate/love an Indian -- The myth of myth -- The spirit lives on -- Indian/not-Indian literature -- Some final thoughts about the non-existence of native American fiction.
Summary: This book has been written with the narrow conviction that if Native American literature is worth thinking about at all, it is worth thinking about as literature. The vast majority of thought that has been poured out onto Native American literature has puddled, for the most part, on how the texts are positioned in relation to history or culture. Rather than create a comprehensive cultural and historical genealogy for Native American literature, David Treuer investigates a selection of the most important Native American novels and, with a novelist's eye and a critic's mind, examines the intricate process of understanding literature on its own terms. Native American Fiction: A User's Manual is speculative, witty, engaging, and written for the inquisitive reader. These essays--on Sherman Alexie, Forrest Carter, James Fenimore Cooper, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, and James Welch--are rallying cries for the need to read literature as literature and, ultimately, reassert the importance and primacy of the word. --Publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: New Arrivals - 2021
Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Main library collection
Stacks
810.9 Tre 2006 Available T 19183
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references.

Introduction: The clouds overhead -- Smartberries -- Lonely wolf -- Plain binoculars -- How to hate/love an Indian -- The myth of myth -- The spirit lives on -- Indian/not-Indian literature -- Some final thoughts about the non-existence of native American fiction.

This book has been written with the narrow conviction that if Native American literature is worth thinking about at all, it is worth thinking about as literature. The vast majority of thought that has been poured out onto Native American literature has puddled, for the most part, on how the texts are positioned in relation to history or culture. Rather than create a comprehensive cultural and historical genealogy for Native American literature, David Treuer investigates a selection of the most important Native American novels and, with a novelist's eye and a critic's mind, examines the intricate process of understanding literature on its own terms. Native American Fiction: A User's Manual is speculative, witty, engaging, and written for the inquisitive reader. These essays--on Sherman Alexie, Forrest Carter, James Fenimore Cooper, Louise Erdrich, Leslie Marmon Silko, and James Welch--are rallying cries for the need to read literature as literature and, ultimately, reassert the importance and primacy of the word. --Publisher.

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