SAR Library Catalog

The island of the Anishnaabeg : thunderers and water monsters in the traditional Ojibwe life-world / Theresa S. Smith.

By: Smith, Theresa S, 1956-Material type: TextTextPublisher: Moscow, Idaho : University of Idaho Press, 1995Description: x, 236 p. : ill. ; 23 cmISBN: 0893011711Subject(s): Ojibwa Indians -- Religion | Ojibwa mythology | Manitoulin Island (Ont.) -- Religious life and customsDDC classification: 299/.783$220 LOC classification: E99.C6 | S715 1995
Contents:
Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction (starting p. 1) -- I Myth, Religion, and the Survival of Ojibwe Tradition -- On the spelling of Ojibwe words, p. 14-15-- (starting p. 17) -- II A Peopled Cosmos (starting p. 43) -- III Thunderers (starting p. 65) -- IV Mishebeshu (starting p. 95) -- V Storm on the Lake (starting p. 127) -- VI The Island of the Anishnaabeg (starting p. 155) -- Epilogue: New Horizons (starting p. 191) -- Appendix 1: Guide to Pronunciation of Ojibwe Words (starting p. 197) -- Appendix 2: Glossary of Ojibwe Words (starting p. 199) -- Appendix 3: List of Anishnaabeg Consultants (starting p. 202) -- Bibliography (starting p. 205) -- Index (starting p. 225).
Summary: Ojibwe religion has experienced a great revival in belief and practice, and this study explores the lived experience of contemporary Ojibwe (or Anishnaabeg). Scholars have contended that traditional Ojibwe religion has been lost in the three centuries following Euro-American contact. Even though traditional religion no longer exists as a plausibility structure for a hunting-gathering culture, historic and contemporary accounts and a revival in the arts attest to the changing and vital nature of Ojibwe religion. The Ojibwe life-world, as experienced and described through religious symbols, beliefs, and practices, is alive with the presence of other-than-human people, known as manitouk. This is the first thorough and systematic interpretive treatment of the relationship between Thunderers and Underwater manitouk. Dr. Smith's work reveals the Thunderers and Water monsters as determinative beings and symbols in the Ojibwe world, and explores how their relationship inscribes a dialectic that both reflects the lived reality of that world and helps to determine the position and existence of the human subject therein.
List(s) this item appears in: New Arrivals - 2021
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299.7 Smi 1995 Checked out 04/04/2022 T 19184
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Thesis (Ph. D.)--Boston University, 1990.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [205]-224) and index.

Illustrations -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction (starting p. 1) -- I Myth, Religion, and the Survival of Ojibwe Tradition -- On the spelling of Ojibwe words, p. 14-15-- (starting p. 17) -- II A Peopled Cosmos (starting p. 43) -- III Thunderers (starting p. 65) -- IV Mishebeshu (starting p. 95) -- V Storm on the Lake (starting p. 127) -- VI The Island of the Anishnaabeg (starting p. 155) -- Epilogue: New Horizons (starting p. 191) -- Appendix 1: Guide to Pronunciation of Ojibwe Words (starting p. 197) -- Appendix 2: Glossary of Ojibwe Words (starting p. 199) -- Appendix 3: List of Anishnaabeg Consultants (starting p. 202) -- Bibliography (starting p. 205) -- Index (starting p. 225).

Ojibwe religion has experienced a great revival in belief and practice, and this study explores the lived experience of contemporary Ojibwe (or Anishnaabeg). Scholars have contended that traditional Ojibwe religion has been lost in the three centuries following Euro-American contact. Even though traditional religion no longer exists as a plausibility structure for a hunting-gathering culture, historic and contemporary accounts and a revival in the arts attest to the changing and vital nature of Ojibwe religion. The Ojibwe life-world, as experienced and described through religious symbols, beliefs, and practices, is alive with the presence of other-than-human people, known as manitouk. This is the first thorough and systematic interpretive treatment of the relationship between Thunderers and Underwater manitouk. Dr. Smith's work reveals the Thunderers and Water monsters as determinative beings and symbols in the Ojibwe world, and explores how their relationship inscribes a dialectic that both reflects the lived reality of that world and helps to determine the position and existence of the human subject therein.

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