McElvain Library Catalog
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List(s) this item appears in: Staley Prize - Best in Anthropology
Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Main library collection
Staley Prize shelf
REF 299.7 Hanks 2010 Not For Loan t 18271
Main library collection
299.7 Han 2010 Available T 15600
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references (p. 403-414) and index.

This pathbreaking synthesis of history, anthropology, and linguistics gives an unprecedented view of the first two hundred years of the Spanish colonization of the Yucatec Maya. Drawing on an extraordinary range and depth of sources, William F. Hanks documents for the first time the crucial role played by language in cultural conquest: how colonial Mayan emerged in the age of the cross, how it was taken up by native writers to become the language of indigenous literature, and how it ultimately became the language of rebellion against the system that produced it. Converting Words includes original analyses of the linguistic practices of both missionaries and Mayas-as found in bilingual dictionaries, grammars, catechisms, land documents, native chronicles, petitions, and the forbidden Maya Books of Chilam Balam. Lucidly written and vividly detailed, this important work presents a new approach to the study of religious and cultural conversion that will illuminate the history of Latin America and beyond, and will be essential reading across disciplinary boundaries.

J.I. Staley Prize, 2015

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