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Brown in the Windy City : Mexicans and Puerto Ricans in postwar Chicago / Lilia Fernandez.

By: Fernandez, LiliaMaterial type: TextTextSeries: Historical studies of urban America: Publisher: Chicago ; London : The University of Chicago Press, 2012Description: xii, 376 : illus ; 24 cmISBN: 9780226244259 (cloth : alkaline paper); 0226244253 (cloth : alkaline paper)Subject(s): Young Lords (Organization) | Mujeres Latinas en Acción -- History | Mexicans -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century | Mexican Americans -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century | Puerto Ricans -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century | Hispanic American neighborhoods -- Illinois -- Chicago -- History -- 20th century | Near West Side (Chicago, Ill.) -- History -- 20th century | Pilsen (Chicago, Ill.) -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 305.89/6872077311 LOC classification: F548.9.M5 | F47 2012
Contents:
Mexican and Puerto Rican labor migration to Chicago -- Putting down roots: Mexican and Puerto Rican settlement on the near west side, 1940-60 -- Race, class, housing, and urban renewal: dismantling the near west side -- Pushing Puerto Ricans around: urban renewal, race and neighborhood change -- The evolution of the Young Lords organization: From street gang to revolutionaries -- From Eighteenth Street to La Dieciocho: neighborhood transformation in the age of the chicano movement -- The limits of nationalism: women's activism and the founding of Mujeres Latinas en Acción -- Conclusion.
Summary: Like other industrial cities in the postwar period, Chicago underwent the dramatic population shifts that radically changed the complexion of the urban north. As African American populations grew and white communities declined throughout the 1960s and ‘70s, Mexicans and Puerto Ricans migrated to the city, adding a complex layer to local racial dynamics. Brown in the Windy City is the first history to examine the migration and settlement of Mexicans and Puerto Ricans in the postwar era. Here, Lilia Fernandez reveals how the two populations arrived in Chicago in the midst of tremendous social and economic change and, in the midst of declining industrial employment and massive urban renewal projects, managed to carve out a geographic and racial place in one of America’s great cities. Over the course of these three decades, through their experiences in the city’s central neighborhoods, Fernández demonstrates how Mexicans and Puerto Ricans collectively articulated a distinct racial position in Chicago, one that was flexible and fluid, neither black nor white.
List(s) this item appears in: Staley 2021 Reading List: Urban Violence, Poverty, Inequality
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Main library collection
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305.89 Fer 2012 Available t 15939
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Mexican and Puerto Rican labor migration to Chicago -- Putting down roots: Mexican and Puerto Rican settlement on the near west side, 1940-60 -- Race, class, housing, and urban renewal: dismantling the near west side -- Pushing Puerto Ricans around: urban renewal, race and neighborhood change -- The evolution of the Young Lords organization: From street gang to revolutionaries -- From Eighteenth Street to La Dieciocho: neighborhood transformation in the age of the chicano movement -- The limits of nationalism: women's activism and the founding of Mujeres Latinas en Acción -- Conclusion.

Like other industrial cities in the postwar period, Chicago underwent the dramatic population shifts that radically changed the complexion of the urban north. As African American populations grew and white communities declined throughout the 1960s and ‘70s, Mexicans and Puerto Ricans migrated to the city, adding a complex layer to local racial dynamics.

Brown in the Windy City is the first history to examine the migration and settlement of Mexicans and Puerto Ricans in the postwar era. Here, Lilia Fernandez reveals how the two populations arrived in Chicago in the midst of tremendous social and economic change and, in the midst of declining industrial employment and massive urban renewal projects, managed to carve out a geographic and racial place in one of America’s great cities. Over the course of these three decades, through their experiences in the city’s central neighborhoods, Fernández demonstrates how Mexicans and Puerto Ricans collectively articulated a distinct racial position in Chicago, one that was flexible and fluid, neither black nor white.

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